SAIL AWAY LADIES

Posted on Posted in Breedloves's Folk Songs
SAIL AWAY LADIES
This started out as a fiddle tune, to which Uncle Dave [Macon] added his own unique
brand of nonsense with some original, some floating verses. Songs like this were called
Negro Folk Rhymes and were used as banjo and fiddle {violin} songs. It should be noted,
however, that even these were quite often repeated without singing or playing. It was
common in the early days of the public schools of the South to hear black children use
them as declamations. The connection, however, of Negro Folk Rhymes with their
secular music production is well worthy of notice. These rhymes then furnished the idea’s
about which the “old time” Negro banjo picker and fiddler clustered his best instrumental
music thoughts. It’s too bad that most of this type of music passed away without being
recorded save by the hearts of men.
Ain’t no use to sit and cry
Sail away, ladies, sail away.
You’ll be an angel by an’ by,
Sail away, ladies, sail away,
CHORUS:
Don’t you rock ‘im die-dy-0,
Don’t you rock ‘im die-dy-0,
Don’t you rock ‘im die-dy-0,
Don’t you rock ‘im die-dy-0.
I’ve got a home in Tennessee,
That’s the place I wanna be,
If ever I get my new house done,
I’ll give the old one to my son,
Come along, boys, and go witb me,
We’ll go down to Tennessee,
Ever I get my new house done,
Love you, pretty girls, one by one.
Hush, little baby, don’t you cry,
You’ll be an angel by and by.