PADDY DOYLE’S BOOTS

Posted on Posted in Breedloves's Folk Songs
PADDY DOYLE’S BOOTS
“Paddy Doyle’s Boots” is what is called a “drag shanty”. Shanties are work songs,
originating in the woods and railway yards of America, and/or the docks and ships of the
early 1800s. It is from these two backgrounds that came the two different spellings:
chanty or shanty. The former has its grounding in the belief that the word chant is in its
origins. Some have even surmised the French word “Chantez”, which means sing or
chant. Others argue the latter for the types of houses that workers lived in around the
railyards and lumberyards – “shanteytowns”. Basically, there are two kinds of shanties.
First are the work shanties: the short drag, short haul, halyard, windlass, or capstan.
Second are the forecastle or fo’castle shanties. These generally are the ballads or tell of
some historical event. They get there name from the part of the ship where the singing
usually took place: the forecastle, which was the crew’s quarters.
Yes, aye, and we’ll haul, aye,
To pay Paddy Doyle for his boots
We’ll taughten the bunt, and we’ll furl aye,
And pay Paddy Doyle for his boots.
Yeo, aye, and we’ll sing aye,
To pay Paddy Doyle for his boots
We’ll bunt up the sail with a fling aye,
And pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!
Yeo, aye an we’ll haul, aye,
To pay Paddy Doyle for his boots;
We’ll skin the ol’ rabbit an’ haul, aye,
To pay Paddy Doyle for his boots