MY LORD WHAT A MORNING

Posted on Posted in Breedloves's Folk Songs
MY LORD WHAT A MORNING
The melody and text of “My Lord, What A Morning” are both from anonymous sources,
though one can safely surmise that both are traceable to the slaves in the southern United
States in the pre-Civil War era. While the text can be repetitive in its down-home sense of
rallying Christian spirit — with several repeating lines throughout its course — the
colorful, sentimental tune offers a bit more variety. Its first half has a sincere and hopeful
sense of pride in its lyrical warmth and unhurried gait, while its latter part turns a bit
brighter but without abandoning its serene religious spirit. This song was typically sung
by a chorus or choir in the nineteenth century and is still performed by choral groups. Yet
it comes across quite effectively when sung by a soloist.
My Lord, what a morning!
My Lord, what a morning!
Oh, my Lord, what a morning
when the stars begin to fall.
Oh, you will hear the trumpet sound
to wake the nations underground,
Looking to my Lord’s right hand
when the stars begin to fall.
Oh, you will see my Jesus come,
His glory shining like the sun,
Looking to my Lord’s right hand
When the stars begin to fall.
Oh, you will hear all Christians shout,
`Cause there’s a new day come about,
Looking to my Lord’s right hand
When the stars begin to fall
My Lord, what a morning!
My Lord, what a morning!
Oh, my Lord, what a morning
when the stars begin to fall