MINGLEWOOD BLUES

Posted on Posted in Breedloves's Folk Songs
MINGLEWOOD BLUES
The earliest recorded version is “Minglewood Blues” by Gus Cannon’s Jug Stompers,
credited to Noah Lewis who played harmonica in the band. Hambone Willie Newbern
recorded it as “Roll and Tumble Blues” in 1929. Other bluesmen recorded their own
versions—such as “If I Had Possession Over Judgment Day” by Robert Johnson(1936)
and “Rollin’ Blues” by John Lee Hooker. The best known version became Muddy Waters’
“Rolling and Tumbling” (1950), with Big Crawford on bass, for the Chess brothers’
Aristocrat Records label in 1950. Leonard Chess insisted that Waters record the song after
Waters had recorded a version for the rival Parkway label, featuring his band mates Little
Walter and Baby Face Leroy Foster. On the earlier, 1950 rendition, the Parkway label
credits the Baby Face Leroy Trio, with vocals by Leroy, and Muddy Waters as the
songwriter. Elmore James recorded the song as “Rollin’ and Tumblin'” in 1960 and has
been also credited as author.
Since the 1960s the song has been played and recorded by hundreds of blues-rock bands,
including Cream on their 1966 debut, Fresh Cream”, Johnny Winter on his 1968 album
The Progressive Blues Experiment”, Canned Heat on their 1967 eponymous debut, Eric
Clapton for his 1992 Unplugged” album and 2004’s Me and Mr. Johnson”, by Jeff Beck
in 2000 on You Had It Coming”, Government Mule on Life Before Insanity” and
recently by Bob Dylan for his 2006 album Modern Times”. Dylan claims authorship of
the song on most versions of his record. While musically the aarrangement is very similar
to the Muddy Waters version, Dylan’s introduces all new verses, though retaining the two
opening lines. To sum it up, there are many variations and interpretations to this song.
Don’t you never let one woman rule your mind
Don’t you never let one woman rule your mind
Said she keep you worried, troubled all the time
Don’t you think your fairer was li’l and cute like mine
Don’t you wish your fairer was li’l and cute like mine
She’s a mar- She’s a married woman,
But she comes to see me all the time
Don’t you never let one woman rule your mind
Don’t you never let one woman rule your mind
Said she keep you worried, troubled all the time
Well I got a letter mama and you ought to hear it read
Well I got a letter Lord and you ought to hear it read
If you comin’ back baby now be on your way