MAKE ME A PALLET ON THE FLOOR

Posted on Posted in Breedloves's Folk Songs

MAKE ME A PALLET ON THE FLOOR

“Mississippi” John Smith Hurt was an influential blues singer and guitarist. Raised in
Avalon, Mississippi, he learned to play guitar at age 9. He spent much of his youth
playing old time music for friends and dances, earning a living as a farm hand into the
1920s. After auditioning “Monday Morning Blues” at his home, he took part in two
recording sessions, in Memphis and New York City . The “Mississippi” tag was added by
OKeh as a sales gimmick. After the commercial failure of the resulting disc and OKeh
records going out of business during the depression, Hurt returned to Avalon and
obscurity, working as a sharecropper and playing local parties and dances.
A stellar performance at the 1963 Newport Folk Festival saw his star rise amongst the
new “folk revival” audience, and before his death in 1966 he played extensively in
colleges, concert halls, coffee houses and even the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, as
well as recording three further albums for Vanguard Records. John Hurt’s influence spans
several music genres including blues, country, bluegrass, folk and contemporary rock and
roll. A soft-spoken man, his nature was reflected in the work, which remained a mellow
mix of country, blues and old time music to the end.
Make me down a pallet on your floor
Make me down a pallet on your floor
Make me down a pallet soft and low
When I’m broken I got no where to go
Been hangin’ around with a good time friends of mine
Hangin’ around with a good time friends of mine
Oh, they treat me very nice and kind
When I’ve got a dollar and a dime
We’re in blues everywhere I see
We’re in blues everywhere I see
We’re in blues, honey, everywhere I see
No one ever had the blues like me
Way I’m sleepin’, my back and shoulders tired
Way I’m sleepin’, my back and shoulders tired
Come tomorrow, I’ll be satisfied
If I can catch that fast train and ride
So, make me down a pallet on your floor
Make me down a pallet on your floor
Make me down a pallet soft and low
Babe, I’m broken, I got no where to go