DIDDY WAH DIDDIE

Posted on Posted in Breedloves's Folk Songs
  • DIDDY WAH DIDDIE
    One of my favorite Blind Blake songs is “Diddie Wa Diddie”. The message contained in
    it is a “mystery” whose answer might seem obvious to some, some could care less, and to
    those like myself, a timeless question whose answer can never be totally understood or
    revealed, only pondered. Another explanation comes from folklorist B. A. Botkin, in “A
    Treasury of Southern Folklore”:
    This is the largest and best known of the Negro mythical places. Its geography is that it is
    “way off somewhere.” It is reached by a road that curves so much that a mule pulling a
    wagon-load of fodder can eat off the back of the wagon as he goes. It is a place of no
    work and no worry for man and beast. A very restful place where even the curbstones are
    good sitting- chairs. The food is even already cooked. If a traveler is hungry all he needs
    do is to sit down on the curbstone and wait and soon he will hear something hollering
    “Eat me! Eat me! Eat me!” and a big baked chicken will come along with a knife and a
    fork stuck in its sides. He can eat all he wants and let the chicken go on to the next on that
    needs something to eat. By that time a big deep sweet potato pie is pushing and shoving
    to get in front of the traveller with a knife all stuck up in the middle of it so he just cuts a
    piece off of that and so on until he finishes his snack. Nobody can ever eat it all up. No
    matter how much you eat it grows that much faster. It is said “Everybody would live in
    Diddie-Wah-Diddie if it wasn’t so hard to find and so hard to get to after you even know
    the way.” Everything is on a large scale there. Even the dogs can stand flat-footed and
    lick the crumbs off heaven’s table. The biggest man there is known as the Moon-
    Regulator because he reaches up and starts and stops it at his convenience. That is why
    there are some dark nights when the moon does not shine at all. He did not feel like
    putting it out that night.
    In the meantime, “I wish somebody would tell me what diddie wa diddie means.”
    There’s a great big mystery, and it sure is worryin’ me.
    This diddie wa diddie, this diddie wa diddie.
    I wish somebody would tell me what
    diddie wa diddie means.
    Had a little girl about four foot four.
    She said, “C’mon papa won’t ya give me some more
    of your diddie wa diddie, of your diddie wa diddie.”
    I wish somebody would tell me what
    diddie wa diddie means.
    I went out and walked around.
    Somebody yelled, “Look who’s in town.
    Mister diddie wa diddie, Mister diddie wa diddie.”
    I wish somebody would tell me what
    diddie wa diddie means.
  • I went to church, put my hat on the seat,
    Lady sat on it, said “Daddy you sure is sweet,
    Mister diddie wa diddie, Mister diddie wa diddie.”
    I wish somebody would tell me what
    diddie wa diddie means.
    I said, “Sister, I’ll soon be gone,
    Just gimme that thing you’re sittin’ on.
    My diddie wa diddie, my diddie wa diddie.”
    I wish somebody would tell me what
    diddie wa diddie means.
    Then I got put out of church,
    ‘Cause I talk about diddie wa diddie too much.
    Mister diddie wa diddie, Mister diddie wa diddie.
    I wish somebody would tell me what
    diddie wa diddie means